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Recommended Medications List

Updated: July 2013

 

 

1. Pepto-Bismol -            Excellent anti bacterial qualities. Some find it helpful to take it before  

                                      meal as a preventative.

 

2. Aspirin-                    Take a capsule per day. Good for the blood and heart.

 

3. Ibuprofen-                Anti- Inflammatory, for aches, minor pain, joint and muscle stiffness, headache and fever

 

4. Ciproxin or Azithromycin  Recommended broad-spectrum antibiotic but some medical resources are now saying it's becoming resistant in Nepal. The new recommendation is Azithromycin. 

 

5. Levaquin or Zithromax      Recommended antibiotic for respiratory infections. This one was just introduced to us by an attending physician on our past trips. We like it not only for it's effectiveness but also it is just a once a day tablet.

                                                

 

6. Cold Remedies            Echinacea and Airborne taken at the right time works really well for us. Refrain from using any drugs that inhibit your respiratory at the higher elevations. Sudafed to use as a decongestant, Neocitron for relief of symptoms. Natural remedies offered by our cook is ginger tea and an abundance for garlic including regular servings of garlic soup.

 

7. Throat Lozenges            Good for symptoms related to the dry air known as the Khumbu cough.

 

8. Face Mask or scarf         Due to the dry seasonal air the trail can get quite bad, especially when passing yak trains. The inexpensive drug store variety work well.

 

9. Purell waterless hand wash- highly recommended and must in everyone's kit. We find that the small bottles work the best.  A couple of them tucked away in the pockets of clothing you wear most helps in fighting bacteria.

 

10. Mole Skin               with scissors or knife for blisters

 

11. Laxatives               Due to the extreme changes in your diet and sleep patterns many find

                                    them to be a helpful addition to your kit.

 

12. Imodium                 For the opposite effect of a laxative.

 

13. Personal Medications:  IE: Asthma, Diabetes, Allergies, etc.

14. Codeine:                For severe pain

15. Anti-Acids:              For upset stomach, nausea, excess stomach acid. IE: Tums, Rolaids

16. Band Aids               2 x 4.5 gauze pads to protect cuts and lacerations

17. Butterfly Band Aids:  To close lacerations

18. Sterile 4 gauze pads:  To cover and protect wounds

19. Two-inch roll of stretch gauze:  For hard to bandage areas

20. Two-inch roll of adhesive cloth tape:  To wrap sprains, secure dressings

21. Three inch self adhesive elastic bandage: For sprains, joint dislocations

22. Aloe Vera gel            For sun and wind burn, dry skin

23. Mild antiseptic soap or hydrogen peroxide: For cleaning abrasions and wounds.

24. Topical antibiotic ointment:  Neosporin: For minor abrasions, wounds.

 

 

Pros and Cons of Diamox:  (High Altitude Medicine) 125mg.

This is a sulfa drug so be careful. If you choose to bring it we highly recommend trying some at home before including it in your kit.

 

We prefer a cleaner and less toxic approach to dealing with altitude. The only time we find Diamox to be helpful is when climbers may be trapped due to bad weather at a high camp and are suffering from headaches and acclimatization. Otherwise the best way to deal with symptoms is to retreat to a lower elevation and try again the next day.  

 

 

Vaccinations: Remember to explore you travel vaccination requirements:

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